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Health & Wellbeing

We can’t live without it, and we spend nearly a third of our entire lives doing it - yet few of us really pay attention to the quality of our sleep. Research shows that having a good platform for your sleep can help improve many aspects of our lives, from our mental health to sore backs.

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Pillows are often something we overlook. Generally, we all tend to pick up the first pillows we see and don't pay attention to what they are. Turns out that using the correct pillow for your sleeping position can help you get better sleep. Pillows are designed to keep the head and spine in line when laying down. The amount of support needed depends on what position you lay into sleep. Here are the best pillows for different sleeping positions. Side Sleepers Sleeping on our sides is the most popular sleeping position. A common issue for side sleepers is that the pillow slowly deflates throughout the night. This leads to the pillow becoming too thin and causing the head to bend downwards. The key to comfort is keeping the spine as straight as possible. A firm, single pillow is the best solution for side sleepers. Using two pillows will cause the head to be too lifted and a soft pillow will cause the head to tilt downwards. Both of these lead to neck problems. To avoid this, choose a firm, supportive pillow such as memory foam. Back Sleepers Sleeping on your back is the perfect position for good spinal health. This position allows the spine to fully relax and remain aligned. The best types of pillows for back sleepers are thin, low pillows. You need to avoid raising the head too much or it will cause the spine to become misaligned. We advise a soft support pillow or alternately, a goose feather pillow will allow your head to sink in and lay flat. Front Sleepers If you can avoid sleeping on your front, you should. Sleeping on your stomach forces your head and spine into an unnatural upward bend. Staying in this position for hours on end will result in a stiff neck and potentially long term damage.. If you find you prefer to sleep on your front then try sleeping without a pillow. If you need to sleep with a pillow make sure it's very soft and thin to protect your spinal health. ...

Posted on 17th Dec 2019
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Napping - some people swear by it and others are against it, but it can be the difference between a productive day and one that falls short. A nap before doing a task can feel as rejuvenating as an 8-hour sleep. That's not to say that you should stop trying to have a healthy nightly sleep pattern. However, when life throws you a curveball, it might just be time to nap. Here are the benefits of napping and how to nap correctly. Benefits of napping Improved memory: When we sleep we take all the things we've done that day and form them into memories. Forming memories is how we learn new skills and facts so it's important to get enough sleep. If you find yourself falling short of sleep at night, try and have a small nap in the day to improve memory.Improve alertness: similarly to improving memory, sleeping improves our alertness. Our alertness gradually decreases throughout the day so if you have a task you need to be alert for, consider taking a nap.More energy: of course, a major benefit of sleeping is increased energy. Sleeping regulates the blood sugars and a lack of sleep can result in the body struggling to regulate sugars. This can result in a drop in energy. Taking a nap when you have a lack of energy will regulate the sugars and help you feel energised.Improved emotional response: without enough sleep, the response centre in the brain can become overly responsive. Causing us to react to situations more intensely. Getting more sleep can improve this reaction and help to regulate mood. How to nap correctly The key to napping is to only nap when you need to. If you get into a routine of napping at the same time every day, you can become dependant on it and throw out your sleep cycle, causing you to nap more. It's important to time your nap correctly too. Napping for longer than 45 minutes can mess with your sleep cycle and do more harm than good. A perfect amount of time is anywhere between 10 and 30 minutes. Anything longer can send you into a REM cycle and you will wake up feeling groggy. If you find yourself feeling groggy after all naps. Try drinking a coffee immediately before the nap. That way when you wake up, the caffeine will have kicked in and will get rid of any drowsiness. Shop our full range of mattresses, here.  ...

Posted on 17th Dec 2019
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If you find yourself waking up in the morning with a sore jaw or a tension headache, you might be grinding your teeth. This common habit is called bruxism and when done at night, it's called sleep bruxism. Sleep bruxism affects 1 in 5 people and is best to try and stop when you first notice the signs. Here's How To Stop Grinding Teeth At Night. The Signs Sleep bruxism is often harder to notice as it happens while unconscious. However there are a few tell tale signs that can alert you to it's presence. One of the more commonly reported signs is tension in the jaw. If you wake up with jaw pain after sleeping, chances are you're grinding your teeth. Another symptom can be consistent morning headaches but it does need to be accompanied by another symptom to be diagnosed as bruxism. Grinding the teeth together regularly will eventually lead to damage of the teeth. If your teeth are starting to chip or wear down, it could be sleep bruxism. How To Stop Sleep bruxism is generally linked to stress and anxiety. While it's not always easy to completely rid stress from your life, you can rid it from your bedroom. Try and create a relaxing sleep environment by ensuring your bed is comfortable and your room is tidy. An uncomfortable bed and an untidy room bring a lot of subconscious stress to us that we may not notice. To reduce general stress, practice mindful awareness. As you close your eyes to drift off to sleep, become aware of the tension in your jaw. Sometimes just the motion of putting your head on the pillow signals the jaw to start clenching. Consciously loosen and relax the muscles in your jaw and your face. If you wake during the night, repeat the relaxation process. If nothing seems to help when trying to prevent sleep bruxism, consider using a mouth-guard while you sleep. A mouth-guard will be issued to you by your dentist and they will consult with you to find the best solution. You can purchase mouth-guards from pharmacy's but it is recommended you get one custom made for regular use to avoid further dental problems. If you're looking to improve your sleep environment, take a look at our range of mattresses, here. ...

Posted on 2nd Dec 2019
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Sleeping poorly after surgery is extremely common in the following days and weeks. It could be from anxiety, pain or medication. But there are ways to prevent and prepare for post-surgery insomnia. Here's How To Sleep Better After A Surgery. Prep Your Sleeping Environment If you have an upcoming surgery or you've just had surgery, it's important to make sure your sleep environment is up to scratch. If your mattress has seen better days and is due an upgrade, now is the perfect time. The last thing you need while recovering is an uncomfortable mattress. On average, it should be replaced up to every 8 years. It's also a good idea to invest in extra pillows before the surgery. This is to elevate limbs if necessary and also to prevent you from rolling on to the area you've had the surgery. If you're wondering what to do with your new pillows once you've recovered. Keep them stored away as backups. You should replace your pillows once a year since pillows lose their support quite quickly so you will make use of them again in no time. Avoid Caffeine If you're struggling to sleep after surgery try your best to avoid caffeine, especially in the afternoon. Your body after surgery is much more vulnerable to the effects of caffeine since it's busy to trying to repair itself. Because of that, it can actually take longer to get out of your system which may disrupt your sleep more than usual. Relax Surgery can be quite distressing and cause you to worry about things more. If you're stressing about getting back on your feet then it might actually take you longer to recover. Stress can slow down the recovery process and of course, cause broken sleep. It's best to take it one day at a time and try your best to relax. Read a book, watch TV and concentrate on feeling better. It will speed up the recovery process and will hopefully allow you to get better sleep. Shop our full range of mattresses and sleep accessories, here. ...

Posted on 2nd Dec 2019
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Whether you leave your heating on all night of have it turn on automatically a few hours before waking. It could be affecting your health. A recent study revealed that 1/3 of the U.K sleep with the heating on all night, while 2/3 of us have it automatically switch on before waking. So, Is Sleeping With The Heating On Bad For Your Health? Here's everything you need to know. INCREASED RISK OF ILLNESS Bacteria thrives in hot, dry climates. Central heating not only heats the room it also reduces to moisture in the air. Making it an ideal place for bacteria to breed. It's advisable to dust around and behind heaters every once in a while since dust and allergens can build up and get disrupted into the air when the heaters are on. DEHYDRATION Generally, after falling asleep with the heating on you will wake up with a headache and dry sinuses. This is because the air becomes incredibly dry and overheating causes us to sweat. Excess sweating whilst sleeping will cause us to become dehydrated at a rapid rate. DISRUPTED SLEEP Overheating whilst asleep is the most common cause of waking up in the night. If you find yourself having disrupted sleep regularly, it might be your bedroom temperature. Disrupted sleep can cause the body to stop functioning as normal and weaken the immune system. Over time this can make you more susceptible to picking up illnesses. TIPS FOR SLEEPING BETTER IN WINTER It's not advisable to sleep with the central heating on all night, but if for any reason you must, make sure the room you sleep is well ventilated. You can do this by opening any vents or alternatively, crack a window. While this may seem counter productive, it's important to keep proper ventilation to avoid illness. If you prefer to have the heating turn on automatically before you wake up. Try turning your bedroom heater on to a low setting or completely off. This will allow the rest of the house to heat up around you without causing you to overheat. To avoid dehydration from using central heating, try and drink a glass of water before heading to sleep. This will help maintain moisture levels in the body whilst sleeping. If you want to keep warm without using the central heating at night, consider investing in a higher togged winter duvet. This a great solution to keeping warm without increasing the risk of illness in winter from heating. ...

Posted on 8th Nov 2019
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If you frequently lose sleep over urinary incontinence, you're not alone. At least 2% of adults lack control over their bladders when sleeping and more than a third of adults use the bathroom twice a night. Fortunately, there are things you can do to prevent these night time interruptions. Here are our Tips For Urinary Incontinence At Bedtime. The Two Types Of Urinary Incontinence: There are two types of urinary incontinence and it's important to figure out which one describes you best. Adult nocturnal enuresis, commonly known as adult bed-wetting is losing control of your bladder whilst continuing to sleep. It affects about 1 to 2 in every 100 adults and can happen any time you are asleep. Nocturia is the frequent need to urinate throughout the night and can occur at any age but is most common among those aged 60 and above. Both conditions can be terribly disrupting and lead to poor sleep quality. Ways To Deal With Bedtime Incontinence There are medications a doctor can prescribe to alleviate bedtime incontinence. However, it's recommended to try and manage it yourself at home first. Try to reduce your alcohol and caffeine intake, especially around bedtime. Both of these have an irritating effect on the bladder and promote excess urination. It's best to stop drinking all fluids 1-2 hours before planning to sleep. Throughout the day, try bladder training exercises. When you find yourself needing to urinate, hold off on using the toilet for as long as you can. This will help to strengthen the bladder and get your body used to holding on to urine for longer periods of time. Mattress Protectors It could take some time to get a handle on your nighttime urinary incontinence. In the meantime, it's important to protect your mattress. Since adult bed-wetting is often caused by stress, the last thing you need is to be worrying about your mattress. Plastic covers are a cheap solution but can become sweaty and uncomfortable. For a little more money, you can purchase newer water repellent protectors. These types of protectors allow the mattress to breathe whilst still being waterproof. They are also available for pillows, blankets and duvets to ensure your whole bed is protected. For extra peace of mind, you can also purchase an entirely waterproof mattress. They're a great option for those that want to keep the mattress protected from fluids and sweat on a permanent basis. If you have a problem with urinary incontinence, discuss it with your doctor until you find a solution that helps you sleep peacefully.  ...

Posted on 24th Sep 2019
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As much as we all don't want to believe it, there is such a thing as too much sleep. Whilst there's nothing wrong with getting those extra Saturday morning lie-ins. Sleeping too much on a regular basis can affect your daily life. Here's How Much Sleep Is Too Much Sleep and the effects of sleeping too much.  The Golden Rule For an adult, the golden rule for sleep is to aim for 7-9 hours per night. This number goes up for children and teenagers and gradually goes down when you get into your late adult life. If you feel extra tired on the weekends, it's actually better for your health to have a short nap throughout the day than to sleep in for a few more hours. Are You Sleeping Too Much? The best way to judge this is how you feel. If you sleep in a little sometimes on the weekends, it’s likely no big deal. If you regularly sleep more than nine hours each night or don’t feel well-rested on less than that, then it may be worth taking a closer look. Health Risks Of Oversleeping Oversleeping has extremely similar effects on the body as under-sleeping. The most common symptoms being poor mental health, cognitive impairment and higher risk for some conditions such as obesity, diabetes, heart disease and stroke. But how can oversleeping and under-sleeping cause the same issues? The truth is, the body works like a machine. Fuelling it with too much or not enough of what it needs is going to affect the overall workings. Everyone is different and it's important to figure out your sweet spot for how much sleep you need. Getting Healthy Sleep Now we know the risks of over and under-sleeping, let's understand how to get healthier sleep. First, you need to find your sweet spot for how many hours sleep you need. To do this, try a week of sleep where you get 7 hours, then a week with 8 hours and finally a week with 9 hours. Jot down how you felt each day in terms of tiredness, alertness and overall mood. At the end of the 3 weeks, you should be able to identify what amount of sleep is best for you. Make sure your sleep environment is up to scratch. Turn off all lights when sleeping, try to keep electronics out of the room and invest in your sleep set up. A huge factor of poor sleep is having the wrong style of mattress for your needs. If you find your mattress isn't what it used to be, it might be time to upgrade.    ...

Posted on 24th Sep 2019
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Most of us will suffer from neck pain at some point in our lives. We all know that bad posture leads to neck and back pain. Sleeping on the wrong kind of mattress or in certain positions can lead to neck and posture issues. So, Is The Way You Sleep Giving You Neck Pain? Sleeping Positions If you sit or stand in an odd position for 8 hours, you would expect to be in pain. The same thing applies to the way we sleep and although it might be comfortable at the time, in a few hours you may cause neck strain. The best and recommended way to sleep is on your back. This position allows the neck and spine to be fully relaxed and rested. With that said, the most common sleeping position is on the side. If you do sleep on your side, make sure your mattress isn't too firm. You need to allow your hip and shoulders to sink in a little allowing your spine to be straight. A great way to keep the spine in line on your side is to sleep with a pillow between your knees. The Right Mattress It's extremely important to find a mattress that suits your needs. If you sleep on your back, you can get away with a firmer mattress. If you sleep on your side or front, you'll need a softer mattress. The firmness of your mattress is also determined by your weight. The lighter you are, the softer the mattress and the heavier, the firmer the mattress. It's also important to replace your mattress every 8 years. If the mattress is showing signs of wear and tear it's not going to be supporting you properly. Preventing Neck Pain The best way to deal with neck pain is to prevent it. Here are some sleep tips to avoid future neck pain: Invest in your pillow - Your pillow supports your neck all night. If your pillows are starting to feel flat, it's time to upgrade.Change up your sleeping position - If you wake up with regular neck pain, it's probably your sleeping position. Mixing up your sleeping position will help you decide what works best for you.Avoid stomach sleeping - Sleeping on your stomach causes a lot of stress on your neck and back. If you can't avoid sleeping on your stomach, make sure you keep your head as flat as possible. You can do this by sleeping with a thin pillow or ideally, without any pillows.  ...

Posted on 24th Sep 2019
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Is it bad to go to bed too soon after eating? We've all heard that eating late can keep you awake at night and cause digestive problems. But is it true and Does Eating Late Keep You Awake? If you find yourself struggling to get to sleep or stay asleep, it might be best to avoid the midnight snack. How long to wait between meals and sleep In general, doctors recommend leaving at least 2-3 hours after eating before heading to bed. This allows for the digestive process to move the food from the stomach to the large intestine. By allowing this delay, it prevents the chances of getting heartburn or stomach aches caused by laying down after eating. Links between certain foods and sleep While eating before bed is best to be avoided, there are certain foods that will help sleep and ones that will hinder. Turkey, pork chops and cherries contain high levels of tryptophan. A substance that turns into melatonin, the chemical that makes us fall asleep. Although these foods might help sleep, they're not the ideal midnight snack. Milk is a popular drink before bed for helping people get to sleep. While milk doesn't have any scientific evidence for helping us sleep, it's an extremely popular bedtime ritual that many find beneficial. So why does food keep us awake? Ultimately, it comes down to the digestive process. If it starts too close to bedtime, the likelihood is you'll find yourself waking up 4-5 hours after falling asleep. In some cases, people find eating a small snack before bedtime doesn't disrupt their sleep but large meals cause them to wake. During the digestive process, the body sorts food into water waste, general waste and energy. Eating a large meal will make begin the sorting process and eventually wake you up either needing the toilet or just feeling wide awake from an influx of energy. So overall, it's best to avoid food before bed if you can. ...

Posted on 22nd Aug 2019
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Throughout the night, we shift through different stages of sleep. Light and deep sleep are both important for our health. But what does it mean? Find out What Is Deep Sleep And Why Is It Important? What Is Deep Sleep? Deep sleep, also known as slow-wave sleep is a stage of NREM (non-rapid eye movement) sleep. This stage of sleep generally occurs in the third stage of sleep. During this cycle of sleep, your body is at it's most relaxed and won't wake easily, even if there are loud noises. Generally, if you wake up feeling groggy and tired, you're probably waking up from a deep sleep. During deep sleep, you experience certain physiological changes. The heart rate slows, muscles relax and brain waves are at their slowest of the sleep cycle. Deep sleep often happens upon falling asleep and continues throughout the first half of your sleep. What Are The Benefits? Deep sleep is the most restorative stage of sleep. Our bodies do the most repairing during this period. This period is also where our energy is restored so if you find yourself waking up tired, you're probably not getting enough of it. This is also the cycle where you process information from the day. A lack of deep sleep means your brain cannot convert information learnt that day into memories. This is why cramming the night before an exam rarely works! The best way to get more deep sleep is to set a sleep schedule and stick to it. If you find yourself going to sleep at random times and waking up at random, you'll likely be losing out on the deep sleep cycle. Another factor is ensuring your sleep environment is comfortable. The most common cause for waking in the night is an uncomfortable bed. Remember to replace your mattress at least every 8 years and pillows every 2 years. ...

Posted on 24th Jul 2019
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With all the technology we could dream of at the tip of our fingers, it's hard to switch off before bed. If you find yourself checking your emails before you fall asleep, you might be damaging your sleep quality. But how do we sleep better? Here's How To Sleep Better If You're A Workaholic. Ditch The Emails Nothing will wake up your brain like checking your emails before you sleep. Thinking about what jobs you need to do tomorrow at 9 am is certainly not the relaxing thought you need before snoozing. It's not just the thought of work tomorrow that will wake you up either. All screens emit blue light which is clinically proven to reduce our ability to sleep. It's advised to stop looking at screens half an hour before bed. So put down the phone and pick up a book! Avoid The Coffee What goes hand in hand with working? You guessed it, coffee. Caffeine is a great way to improve productivity at work but not so great when you're trying to fall asleep at night. The best way to get your caffeine kick without affecting your sleep is to not drink coffee after lunchtime. This gives your body enough time to break down caffeine reserves and slowly wind down for bedtime. Wind Down As humans, we love a routine. Our brains respond well to consistency and this applies to sleep too. Throughout the week try and allow 1 - 2 hours of winding down before bedtime. Whether it's taking the dog for a walk, reading a book or watching a movie. It's important to take the time to completely switch your brain off from the workday. Of course, T.V is a popular way of winding down in the evening. Just make sure to switch it off 30 minutes before bed to stop blue light interfering with your sleep. Comfort Is Key If you're already struggling to fall asleep, the last thing you need is an uncomfy bed thrown into the mix. Our sleep environment plays a huge role in how we sleep and updating it when necessary is key. We advise replacing your mattress at most every 8 years. If your mattress feels like it's seen better days, update it as soon as you can. A poor mattress leads to back and neck pain and in some instances, sleep deprivation.  ...

Posted on 6th Jun 2019
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In general, the older we get, the less sleep we get too. Most people put it down to a natural part of ageing. But is that true? Do older people need less sleep or are we damaging our health? Find out how much sleep you should be getting and how to improve sleep quality. How Much Sleep Should I Get? From the ages of 0 - 18 years, we need the most sleep. Around 9 - 10 hours per night. This is because our brains are still developing and more sleep is required to recover from the day. Entering into young adulthood, we need less sleep to recover and require an average of 7 - 9 hours per night to function. So what happens when we reach late adulthood? Contrary to popular belief, we actually need the same amount of sleep the whole way through adulthood. The average 50 - 80-year-old gets around 5 - 7 hours per night. Coming in a few hours under the recommended amount per night. Over time, this can lead to early onset health conditions such as heart conditions and Alzheimer's. Therefore it's important to learn ways to improve your sleep health. How To Sleep For Longer If you find yourself undercutting the amount of sleep you need every night. You might be suffering from insomnia. Insomnia affects 90% of us at some point during our lives, with a staggering 44% of that during our senior years. It's especially important to monitor your sleep the older you get to prevent early onset conditions. So, how can you sleep for longer? Exercise A huge reason we sleep less in our senior years is because of a lack of exercise. It's important to try and get 20 active minutes per day. Even if it's cleaning the house, gardening or walking the dog. Every bit of movement counts. Sleep Environment Your sleep environment is key to a good nights sleep. More than anything, it's important to ensure your mattress suits your sleep needs. In general, the older we get, the firmer the mattress we need. This is because of the extra strain placed on our joints over time. Orthopaedic mattresses are a great solution for prolonged back pain. Avoid Blue Light Blue light is the type of light that screens emit. Including televisions, smartphones and tablets. We all tend to watch a bit of t.v before sleep or check our phones. If you're struggling to stay asleep, try avoiding blue light for at least 30 minutes before sleep. ...

Posted on 29th May 2019
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Whenever we sleep poorly throughout the week, we all think 'I'll make up for it at the weekend'. But those extra hours in bed might not be helping the situation. So, can you make up for lost sleep? And if you can't, what should you do? Can you catch up on sleep? The answer to this is no. While getting a few extra hours on the weekend won't do you any harm. It's not possible to make up for lost sleep. A few bad nights of sleep won't do any long term damage. But constantly depriving your body of sleep on a weeknight can have adverse effects long term. There is a strong link with getting too little sleep on a daily basis and developing certain metabolic conditions like diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular conditions. How much should you sleep? You should aim to get at least 7 hours of sleep per night. That is how much the body needs to be fully functionally. However, everyone needs a different amount of sleep to suit their own body. If you feel tired you should listen to your body and try and sleep longer. Some people function best on 9 hours and some function best at 7.5 hours. It's all down to figuring out what suits you best. How can you avoid catching up on sleep? The best way to not have to catch up on sleep at the weekends is to set a proper sleep schedule. It's important to make it realistic and something you can stick to. If you know you'll be getting home at 8 pm on a Thursday then setting a sleep schedule for 9 pm is setting you up to fail. Look at exactly what times are best for you to go to bed each night and stick to it as closely as possible. Even on weekends. We all tend to throw our sleep schedule out on a weekend but it will have an effect on your weeknight sleep schedule if you do.  ...

Posted on 11th Apr 2019
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We've all been laying there at 3 am counting sheep hoping to fall asleep soon. Having trouble falling asleep is totally normal but can be frustrating. But are there any quick fixes? Turns out, there is. Here are the best methods to fall asleep revealed. Lower The Temperature A huge factor for not being able to fall asleep is being too hot. If you find yourself tossing and turning then try lowering the room temperature. A great way to avoid sleepless summer nights is to have a separate summer duvet. A breatheable fabric will make the world of difference on hot nights. Relax Before Bed Nothing prevents sleep like a racing mind. Even if it's late at night and you need to go to bed. Taking 30 minutes to relax will speed up how long it takes you to fall asleep. Whether it's reading or listening to a podcast, winding down is important before bed. Darkness Light interferes with our ability to fall and stay asleep. Making your bedroom as dark as possible will improve the time it takes to fall asleep. Our bodies run on a light to dark schedule. When it's light out, we're less likely to fall asleep due to our body clock. Using black out curtains can really help. Avoid The Clock Whatever you do, if you're struggling to fall asleep, do not look at the clock. Looking at how many hours we have till we wake up increases stress levels which will prevent sleep. It's much better to not know how many hours sleep you get than to clock watch. Get Comfortable Comfort obviously plays a huge role in sleep quality. If you're not comfortable, you'll struggle to fall and stay asleep. It's been proven that the optimal comfort for everyone is a medium-firm mattress. Medium-firm mattresses reduce the pressure in the muscles and ultimately lead to a comfortable, peaceful nights sleep. ...

Posted on 3rd Apr 2019
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Generally, women and men differ when it comes to sleep requirements. Men tend to be heavier than women and can require a different firmness based on that. Women are also more likely to wake through the night and suffer from hot spells mid-sleep. So, here's our Mattress Buying Advice For Women. Choose The Right Firmness It's extremely important to figure out what mattress firmness is right for you. Women are more likely to have disturbed sleep, which can be worsened by the wrong mattress. Height, weight and sleeping position are all things to consider when picking a mattress. However, it mostly comes down to what comfort you prefer. Soft Mattress - Ideal for those that like a 'sinking' feelingSoft - Medium Mattress - Perfect for those that like a soft feel but require extra supportMedium Mattress - Medium firmness is the best all rounder and suits most people.Medium - Firm Mattress - A little on the firmer side but still has some give.Firm Mattress - A supportive mattress for those with back pain or 16 stone and above. Materials Women tend to fluctuate in temperature throughout the night due to hormones. If you find yourself waking up too hot or cold on a regular basis a mattress made from natural materials is a great choice. Temperature controlled memory foam is also a style of mattress for those that fluctuate in temperature. If you tend to get too hot when sleeping, a gel-foam mattress can help cool you when sleeping and prevent disturbed sleep. Body frame Women tend to have more curves to the body. Including wider hips and shoulders which needs to be taken into account when choosing a mattress. If you do have wide hips and shoulders and like to sleep on your side is important to choose a softer mattress. This is because a soft mattress will allow the hips and shoulders to sink in and keep the spine aligned correctly. Generally, a softer mattress is better for women since the contours of the body can be absorbed by the mattress taking pressure off the spine. Shop our full range of mattresses, here. ...

Posted on 10th Jan 2019
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For allergy sufferers, picking the right mattress is important. Bedrooms contain a lot of allergen triggers, such as dust mites, damp and bacteria. Certain mattress styles can harbour these allergens easier than others. Making them a problem for allergy sufferers. Here are the best mattresses for allergy sufferers. Hypoallergenic Mattresses Most mattresses are now designed to be hypoallergenic. However, foam mattresses are impenetrable to bacteria and dust mites, making them the perfect choice for allergy sufferers. There are plenty of foam mattresses available to suit all sleeping needs, including memory foam, latex, gel foam and reflex foam. Mattress Protectors Keeping your mattress as hygienic as possible is going to give you the best chance of fighting off allergens. A mattress protector is a great way of stopping sweat and general grime penetrating your mattress. On average, we lost around 250ml of sweat per night. Which will cause bacteria to form in the mattress and eventually become an allergy ridden hub. Anti-allergy Bedding Another extra step to avoid allergies is anti-allergy bedding. Featuring dust resistant fillings, it's a lot harder to become ridden with dust and dust mites. There is plenty of anti-allergy bedding available to suit all needs. Including pillows, duvets and mattress protectors. Caring For Your Anti-allergy Mattress Keeping on top of mattress care not only prolongs the life of your mattress it's also important to reduce allergens. As a rule of thumb, we should all look to replace our mattresses every 8 years. This is to avoid a build-up of bacteria and loss of correct support. Flipping or rotating your mattress every three months will help to keep the mattress from collecting bacteria. Giving a mattress a deep clean every 6 months will also help with allergies. Be sure to vacuum to remove any excess dust. Shop our full range of mattresses & accessories, here. ...

Posted on 30th Nov 2018
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As we get older, our sleeping needs change. The soft mattress we used to love might not be providing correct support to our backs and joints. Because of this, it might become difficult to get in and out of bed or provide restless sleep. A good sleep regime is important to our overall health and it all starts with a good mattress. Here's our Mattress Guide For The Older Customer to help you make your next mattress decision. Which mattress should I buy? Before deciding on a mattress, it's important to figure out your sleep needs. For example, if you find yourself aching in the morning, it might be time to upgrade to a firmer design. Ultimately, it all comes down to personal preference, here are some things to consider: Firmness Preferences Back or joint pain Key features i.e mobility aid, pocket sprung, memory foam What is an orthopaedic mattress? Orthopaedic mattresses are typically designed to support ageing joints. In general, they are much firmer than a regular mattress and because of this, provide great support to aching backs and joints. Designed to keep the spine in perfect alignment, they can lead to overall better posture and fewer aches. If you find yourself with existing aches and pains that are seemingly made worse by your mattress, an orthopaedic mattress could be a great option. Would a foam mattress meet my needs? Similarly to an orthopaedic mattress, foam mattresses are designed to relieve pressure from the body and keep everything in correct alignment. They are a great choice if you're getting older and would like something supportive and on the softer side. Foam mattresses are ideal if you do not have a pre-existing back condition but would like a mattress that is easier on the joints. What are the benefits of an adjustable bed? If you find yourself with limited mobility, adjustable beds can be the extra helping hand you need. Adjustable beds have the ability to raise you into a seated position making it much easier to get in and out of bed, all from the touch of a button. They can also help with poor circulation. Since you can adjust each part of the bed, it's easy to elevate the legs above the heart which promotes healthy blood flow. Shop our full range of mattresses, here....

Posted on 7th Nov 2018
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There are many elements that come into play when it comes time for you to shop for the right bed or mattress.The construction of the mattress is a very important factor, your personal sleeping position is also of great importance in what makes a good bed for you personally. The adjustable beds and high-end memory foam beds are great for any sleep style, as they have focused support, these are not alwaysthe most budget-friendly options. Before we can find out what types of beds are best for each sleep style, there are some things youneed to understand: supportiveness, conformability, and firmness. Supportiveness The term “supportiveness” concerns how well a mattress keeps the sleeper's body on a level, flat plane and not allowing any part of the body to be lower or higher than the rest. More often than not, supportiveness is undermined by sagging of the mattress rather than the softness. The top complaint of individuals about their beds is that the mattress is sagging. Quite often, the middle of the mattress will become compressed and be much lower than the rest. This will put a person’s back into a very unnatural position, which can cause pain and discomfort. Conformability The term “conformability” describes how the mattress moulds, or conforms, to the body’s natural contours. Beds have good conformability if one’s entire body is supported equally. When there are gaps in support, this is a lack of conformability, which results in stress being put on part of the body, particularly the lower spine, which again, can cause pain and discomfort. Firmness An important factor in choosing the right bed is the right firmness. There are several different typesof firmness when it comes to choosing the right bed for you. Medium Firmness Beds- tend to be firm enough to provide the proper support, but yet soft enough to provide conformability. Firm Beds- tend to offer great support, but have very little- if any- conformability.Soft Beds- tend to offer great conformability, but offer very little- if any- support. Now that we have covered these terms, let’s explore the different sleep styles and the beds that best suit each one. Side Sleeper Side sleepers are the most common sleep style. Side sleepers need beds that won’t put stress on their hips and shoulders but instead will decrease pressure from those parts. Beds that are moderately softer is a great option for side sleepers because their body will just sink into the mattress. The softer mattress accommodates the natural curve of the body and helps to keep the spine aligned. A pocketed coil mattress is the best option for a side sleeper. Back Sleeper Those individuals who sleep on their back need lower back support. For these sleepers, it is best to avoid those beds that have very stiff springs, because the springs tend to push against the spine and don’t allow for the natural curve of the back. However, on the other hand, beds that are too soft won’t give enough support to the back and body. Back sleepers need beds which are medium-firm. An innerspring mattress is the best option for the back sleeper. Stomach Sleeper Those who sleep on their stomachs need beds which are stiffer and firmer that will help to keep the body afloat rather than allowing the body to sink in. Stomach sleepers tend to adopt this sleeping style because they have lower back pain, and this style has the least spine alignment. An innerspring mattress is the best option for the stomach sleeper. Combination of Styles Most people fall into this sleeping style category, which means that there is a lot of movement in the beds. Those who have this sleep style need beds that will be personally suitable to your individual comforts. You need one that is not too stiff when you’re on your side and not too soft when you rollonto your stomach. Typically, combination sleepers find that beds with innerspring pocket coils or latex foam are most comfortable. ...

Posted on 30th Oct 2018
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There are few things greater in life than a good night's sleep. It all starts with a good mattress. Choosing the right firmness is the biggest decision you'll make when purchasing a new mattress. With options from soft, all the way up to orthopaedic firm available, deciding what's right for you can be a little confusing. Using our handy guide will help you find your perfect mattress, whatever your needs may be. So, What Mattress Firmness is Right for Me? Soft (1) Although soft sounds like it will be the comfiest option. It can damage your back if it's not suited to your needs. Soft mattresses are great for those that are lighter in weight and build. They can also be a great option for those that prefer to sleep on their side. Soft to Medium (2) Soft to medium mattresses can be great for those that want a softer feel but some extra support where it's needed. With around 1-3 inches of sinkage, they are an ideal option for side sleepers and back sleepers that prefer a sinking feeling. Medium (3) Medium firmness is considered to be the universal mattress. A good option for everyone depending on their comfort preferences. If you're on the lighter side but prefer a firmer feel, or on the heavier side but prefer a softer feel, mediums are an all-around great choice. Medium to Firm (4) A medium to firm mattress is a common compromise between couples that can't decide between the two. This is because it can suit a variety of weights and sleeping preferences while providing good support for everyone. A medium to firm surface is particularly suited to those that prefer to sleep on their back. Firm (5) Firm mattresses are particularly suited to those with a larger frame or potential back problems. A lot of these types of mattress may be considered orthopaedic and are not very suitable for those of slighter build. Firm mattresses are also great for those that prefer to sleep on their front, the hardest position to get correct support. ...

Posted on 5th Oct 2018
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On average, sleeping takes up a whole third of our day. We spend so much time in bed, it’s important to make sure our sleep environment is up to scratch. But how can you tell when a mattress has run its course? In general, The Sleep Council recommend replacing your mattress every 7 years. But often, you need to use your best judgment. Here are some signs you might need to change your mattress: Comfort The easiest way to tell if your mattress needs replacing is of course, how it feels. If you've noticed that it has lost its bounce or is becoming much softer. It's definitely time for a new mattress. The reason The Sleep Council recommends changing a mattress every 7 years is that, in general, that's how long the materials can last. After this amount of time, they will start to deteriorate and become uncomfortable. Hygiene Over time, even if you take proper care, your mattress is bound to become unhygienic. On average, people lose around half a pint of fluid per night. This is the perfect environment for bacteria to form, which eventually leads to dust mites. Dust mites produce allergens which cause an unhealthy sleep environment. So, if your mattress is starting to look unhygienic it’s probably time for an upgrade. Lumps Lumps and dips in mattresses are common when they need replacing. If a mattress has deteriorated to this point, it's likely you will start experiencing neck and back pain. This is because the structure in mattresses is designed to relieve pressure and align your spine. When the structure of the mattress alters, it can no longer support your joints correctly and can lead to nasty neck paint. Waking Up Often sleeping on an old worn mattress will cause restless sleep. Tossing and turning is common with worn mattresses because the mattress isn’t correctly supporting your spine. Causing you to subconsciously move around, looking for a comfy spot. This can cause you or your partner to wake up throughout the night, leading to poor sleep quality. If you feel like your mattress has seen better days, shop our range of affordable, quality mattresses at www.mattressnextday.co.uk. In need of a little extra advice? Our sleep experts are always happy to help....

Posted on 27th Sep 2018
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